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IncyteCARES for ZYNYZ is a
program for residents
of the
United States and Puerto Rico.

Patient Terms and Conditions. Update effective as of January 1, 2023. Maximum benefits per claim and per calendar year apply. You must have minimum out-of-pocket costs of $15.01 to redeem this. Patients will be responsible for any out-of-pocket costs above the maximum annual and monthly program benefit. Program benefit applies to medication cost only and does not cover any costs to administer the medication. Program is valid through December 31 of the year of issue. On January 1 of the following year, the program automatically resets and is subject to annual limits if the primary plan benefit remains the same. Offer is not valid if you are uninsured or paying cash for your treatment. Offer is not valid if you are enrolled in a federal or state healthcare program (including Medicare Part B, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, TRICARE, or any state medical or pharmaceutical assistance program). If you move or switch from commercial benefit coverage to any government benefit coverage, you will no longer be eligible. This program is not insurance. Offer valid only for an FDA-approved or recognized compendia use. You are responsible for reporting receipt of program benefits to any commercial insurer that pays for or reimburses any part of the services filled with this program, to the extent required by law or by the insurer. You agree not to seek reimbursement from your insurer or any other third party for all or any part of the benefit received through this offer. This offer may not be sold, purchased, traded, or transferred and is void if reproduced. Use of this offer does not obligate you to use or continue to use ZYNYZ™ (retifanlimab-dlwr). No other purchase and no refills are necessary. This offer is limited to one (1) per person during this offering period and is not transferable. You are responsible for all taxes. No membership fees. Offer is good only in the United States and Puerto Rico, and void where prohibited or otherwise restricted by law. Incyte Corporation reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend this program without notice. If you have any questions, please call 1-855-452-5234.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ZYNYZ is a programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)–blocking antibody indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced Merkel cell carcinoma.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed may not be inclusive of all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. Immune-mediated adverse reactions can occur at any time after starting treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, they can also manifest after discontinuation of PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Immune-mediated adverse reactions affecting more than one body system can occur simultaneously.

Early identification and management of immune‐mediated adverse reactions are essential to ensure safe use of PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity. In general, if ZYNYZ requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1-2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to ≤ Grade 1. Upon improvement to ≤ Grade 1, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroids.

Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed subsequently.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. In patients treated with other PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, the incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation.

Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3% (13/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including 1 (0.2%) patient with a fatal pneumonitis, Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (1.4%). Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 77% (10/13) of patients with pneumonitis. Pneumonitis resolved in 10 of the 13 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for pneumonitis, 3 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of pneumonitis.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated colitis. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation have occurred in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis treated with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 1.6% (7/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (0.2%), and Grade 2 (0.7%). Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 71% (5/7) of patients. Colitis resolved in 4 of the 7 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for colitis, 1 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; this patient did not have recurrence of colitis.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 3% (13/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.3%), and Grade 2 (0.5%). Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1.4% of patients and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 85% (11/13) of patients. Hepatitis resolved in 6 of the 13 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for hepatitis, 2 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of hepatitis.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Adrenal Insufficiency

ZYNYZ can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For ≥ Grade 2 adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment per institutional guidelines, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.7% (3/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (0.5%) and Grade 2 (0.2%). Adrenal insufficiency did not lead to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ. ZYNYZ was withheld for 1 patient with adrenal insufficiency. All patients required systemic corticosteroids. Adrenal insufficiency resolved in 1 of the 3 patients.

Hypophysitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field cuts. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Hypophysitis occurred in 0.5% (2/440, both Grade 2) of patients receiving ZYNYZ. No patients discontinued or withheld ZYNYZ due to hypophysitis. All patients required systemic steroids. Hypophysitis resolved in 1 of the 2 patients.

Thyroid Disorders

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement or medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Thyroiditis occurred in 0.7% (3/440, all Grade 1) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (4.8%). No patients discontinued or withheld ZYNYZ due to thyroiditis. Thyroiditis resolved in 1 of the 3 patients.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism occurred in 10% (42/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (4.8%). No patients discontinued ZYNYZ due to hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.5% of patients. Systemic corticosteroids were required for 1 patient and 79% (33/42) of patients received endocrine therapy.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism occurred in 6% (24/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (2.5%). No patients discontinued ZYNYZ due to hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient. Systemic corticosteroids were required for 13% (3/24) of patients and 46% (11/24) of patients received endocrine therapy.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Which Can Present with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Withhold ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in 0.2% (1/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions. Type 1 diabetes mellitus led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient. This event led to ZYNYZ being withheld and did not lead to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ. The patient received insulin.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated nephritis. Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 1.6% (7/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.5%), Grade 3 (0.7%), and Grade 2 (0.5%). Nephritis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients and withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 57% (4/7) of patients. Nephritis resolved in 3 of the 7 patients. The 1 patient in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for immune-mediated nephritis had ZYNYZ reinitiated after symptom improvement and did not have recurrence of immune-mediated nephritis.

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Immune-mediated skin reactions occurred in 8% (36/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (7%). Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 2.3% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 25% (9/36) of patients. Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions resolved in 75% (27/36) of patients. Of the 10 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions, 7 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of < 1% in 440 patients who received ZYNYZ or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, including severe or fatal cases.

Cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis

Gastrointestinal: pancreatitis, to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis

Musculoskeletal: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae, including renal failure), arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica

Neurological: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy

Ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment to include blindness can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Endocrine: hypoparathyroidism

Other (Hematologic/Immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

A severe infusion-related reaction (Grade 3) occurred in 1 (0.2%) of 440 patients receiving ZYNYZ. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ based on severity of reaction. Consider premedication with an antipyretic and/or an antihistamine for patients who have had previous systemic reactions to infusions of therapeutic proteins.

Complications of Allogeneic HSCT

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action, ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Animal studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway can lead to increased risk of immune-mediated rejection of the developing fetus, resulting in fetal death. Advise women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ZYNYZ and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

The safety of ZYNYZ was evaluated in 105 patients enrolled in the POD1UM-201 trial with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced MCC.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 22% of patients receiving ZYNYZ. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥ 2% of patients) were fatigue, arrhythmia, and pneumonitis.

Permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ due to an adverse reaction occurred in 11% of patients. These included asthenia, atrial fibrillation, concomitant disease progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, demyelinating polyneuropathy, eosinophilic fasciitis, increased transaminases, infusion-related reaction, lung disorder, pancreatitis, polyarthritis, and radiculopathy (1 patient each).

Dosage interruptions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 25% of patients who received ZYNYZ. Adverse reactions or laboratory abnormalities that required dosage interruption in ≥ 2% of patients who received ZYNYZ were increased transaminases, increased lipase, increased amylase, pneumonitis, and pyrexia.

The most common (≥ 10%) adverse reactions that occurred in patients receiving ZYNYZ were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, pruritus, diarrhea, rash, pyrexia, and nausea.

Specific Populations

Based on its mechanism of action, ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on the use of ZYNYZ in pregnant women. Human IgG4 immunoglobulins are known to cross the placenta; therefore, retifanlimab-dlwr has the potential to be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus. Advise women of the potential risk to a fetus.

There is no information regarding the presence of retifanlimab-dlwr in human milk, or its effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 4 months after the last dose of ZYNYZ.

ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.

Verify pregnancy status in females of reproductive potential prior to initiating ZYNYZ.

Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ZYNYZ and for 4 months after the last dose.

The safety and effectiveness of ZYNYZ have not been established in pediatric patients.

Of the 65 patients with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced MCC treated with ZYNYZ, 79% were ≥ 65 years, and 37% were ≥ 75 years. Clinical studies of ZYNYZ did not include sufficient numbers of younger adult patients to determine if patients ≥ 65 years of age respond differently than younger adult patients.

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Incyte Corporation at 1-855-463-3463.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for ZYNYZ for additional Important Safety Information.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ZYNYZ is a programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)–blocking antibody indicated for the treatment of adult patients with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced Merkel cell carcinoma.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on tumor response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Severe and Fatal Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

Important immune-mediated adverse reactions listed may not be inclusive of all possible severe and fatal immune-mediated reactions.

Immune-mediated adverse reactions, which may be severe or fatal, can occur in any organ system or tissue. Immune-mediated adverse reactions can occur at any time after starting treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody. While immune-mediated adverse reactions usually manifest during treatment with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, they can also manifest after discontinuation of PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Immune-mediated adverse reactions affecting more than one body system can occur simultaneously.

Early identification and management of immune‐mediated adverse reactions are essential to ensure safe use of PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Monitor patients closely for symptoms and signs that may be clinical manifestations of underlying immune-mediated adverse reactions. Evaluate liver enzymes, creatinine, and thyroid function at baseline and periodically during treatment. In cases of suspected immune-mediated adverse reactions, initiate appropriate workup to exclude alternative etiologies, including infection. Institute medical management promptly, including specialty consultation as appropriate.

Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity. In general, if ZYNYZ requires interruption or discontinuation, administer systemic corticosteroid therapy (1-2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent) until improvement to ≤ Grade 1. Upon improvement to ≤ Grade 1, initiate corticosteroid taper and continue to taper over at least 1 month. Consider administration of other systemic immunosuppressants in patients whose immune-mediated adverse reactions are not controlled with corticosteroids.

Toxicity management guidelines for adverse reactions that do not necessarily require systemic steroids (e.g., endocrinopathies and dermatologic reactions) are discussed subsequently.

Immune-Mediated Pneumonitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated pneumonitis. In patients treated with other PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, the incidence of pneumonitis is higher in patients who have received prior thoracic radiation.

Immune-mediated pneumonitis occurred in 3% (13/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including 1 (0.2%) patient with a fatal pneumonitis, Grade 3 (0.9%), and Grade 2 (1.4%). Pneumonitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 77% (10/13) of patients with pneumonitis. Pneumonitis resolved in 10 of the 13 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for pneumonitis, 3 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of pneumonitis.

Immune-Mediated Colitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated colitis. Cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation have occurred in patients with corticosteroid-refractory immune-mediated colitis treated with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. In cases of corticosteroid-refractory colitis, consider repeating infectious workup to exclude alternative etiologies.

Immune-mediated colitis occurred in 1.6% (7/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (0.2%), and Grade 2 (0.7%). Colitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 71% (5/7) of patients. Colitis resolved in 4 of the 7 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for colitis, 1 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; this patient did not have recurrence of colitis.

Immune-Mediated Hepatitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated hepatitis. Immune-mediated hepatitis occurred in 3% (13/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.2%), Grade 3 (2.3%), and Grade 2 (0.5%). Hepatitis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1.4% of patients and withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 85% (11/13) of patients. Hepatitis resolved in 6 of the 13 patients. Of the 4 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for hepatitis, 2 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of hepatitis.

Immune-Mediated Endocrinopathies

Adrenal Insufficiency

ZYNYZ can cause primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. For ≥ Grade 2 adrenal insufficiency, initiate symptomatic treatment per institutional guidelines, including hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Adrenal insufficiency occurred in 0.7% (3/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (0.5%) and Grade 2 (0.2%). Adrenal insufficiency did not lead to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ. ZYNYZ was withheld for 1 patient with adrenal insufficiency. All patients required systemic corticosteroids. Adrenal insufficiency resolved in 1 of the 3 patients.

Hypophysitis

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated hypophysitis. Hypophysitis can present with acute symptoms associated with mass effect such as headache, photophobia, or visual field cuts. Hypophysitis can cause hypopituitarism. Initiate hormone replacement as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Hypophysitis occurred in 0.5% (2/440, both Grade 2) of patients receiving ZYNYZ. No patients discontinued or withheld ZYNYZ due to hypophysitis. All patients required systemic steroids. Hypophysitis resolved in 1 of the 2 patients.

Thyroid Disorders

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated thyroid disorders. Thyroiditis can present with or without endocrinopathy. Hypothyroidism can follow hyperthyroidism. Initiate hormone replacement or medical management of hyperthyroidism as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Thyroiditis occurred in 0.7% (3/440, all Grade 1) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (4.8%). No patients discontinued or withheld ZYNYZ due to thyroiditis. Thyroiditis resolved in 1 of the 3 patients.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism occurred in 10% (42/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (4.8%). No patients discontinued ZYNYZ due to hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 0.5% of patients. Systemic corticosteroids were required for 1 patient and 79% (33/42) of patients received endocrine therapy.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism occurred in 6% (24/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 2 (2.5%). No patients discontinued ZYNYZ due to hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient. Systemic corticosteroids were required for 13% (3/24) of patients and 46% (11/24) of patients received endocrine therapy.

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Which Can Present with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Monitor patients for hyperglycemia or other signs and symptoms of diabetes. Initiate treatment with insulin as clinically indicated. Withhold ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus occurred in 0.2% (1/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (0.2%) adverse reactions. Type 1 diabetes mellitus led to withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient. This event led to ZYNYZ being withheld and did not lead to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ. The patient received insulin.

Immune-Mediated Nephritis with Renal Dysfunction

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated nephritis. Immune-mediated nephritis occurred in 1.6% (7/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 4 (0.5%), Grade 3 (0.7%), and Grade 2 (0.5%). Nephritis led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 0.9% of patients and withholding of ZYNYZ in 1 patient.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 57% (4/7) of patients. Nephritis resolved in 3 of the 7 patients. The 1 patient in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for immune-mediated nephritis had ZYNYZ reinitiated after symptom improvement and did not have recurrence of immune-mediated nephritis.

Immune-Mediated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions

ZYNYZ can cause immune-mediated rash or dermatitis. Bullous and exfoliative dermatitis, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, has occurred with PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies. Topical emollients and/or topical corticosteroids may be adequate to treat mild to moderate non-exfoliative rashes. Withhold or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ depending on severity.

Immune-mediated skin reactions occurred in 8% (36/440) of patients receiving ZYNYZ, including Grade 3 (1.1%) and Grade 2 (7%). Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions led to permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ in 1 patient and withholding of ZYNYZ in 2.3% of patients.

Systemic corticosteroids were required in 25% (9/36) of patients. Immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions resolved in 75% (27/36) of patients. Of the 10 patients in whom ZYNYZ was withheld for immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions, 7 reinitiated ZYNYZ after symptom improvement; of these, 1 had recurrence of immune-mediated dermatologic adverse reactions.

Other Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions

The following clinically significant immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred at an incidence of < 1% in 440 patients who received ZYNYZ or were reported with the use of other PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibodies, including severe or fatal cases.

Cardiac/vascular: myocarditis, pericarditis, vasculitis

Gastrointestinal: pancreatitis, to include increases in serum amylase and lipase levels, gastritis, duodenitis

Musculoskeletal: myositis/polymyositis, rhabdomyolysis (and associated sequelae, including renal failure), arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica

Neurological: meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination, myasthenic syndrome/myasthenia gravis (including exacerbation), Guillain-Barré syndrome, nerve paresis, autoimmune neuropathy

Ocular: uveitis, iritis, and other ocular inflammatory toxicities. Some cases can be associated with retinal detachment. Various grades of visual impairment to include blindness can occur. If uveitis occurs in combination with other immune-mediated adverse reactions, consider a Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada–like syndrome, as this may require treatment with systemic steroids to reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.

Endocrine: hypoparathyroidism

Other (Hematologic/Immune): hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi lymphadenitis), sarcoidosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, solid organ transplant rejection.

Infusion-Related Reactions

A severe infusion-related reaction (Grade 3) occurred in 1 (0.2%) of 440 patients receiving ZYNYZ. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infusion-related reactions. Interrupt or slow the rate of infusion or permanently discontinue ZYNYZ based on severity of reaction. Consider premedication with an antipyretic and/or an antihistamine for patients who have had previous systemic reactions to infusions of therapeutic proteins.

Complications of Allogeneic HSCT

Fatal and other serious complications can occur in patients who receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before or after being treated with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody. Transplant-related complications include hyperacute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, hepatic veno-occlusive disease after reduced intensity conditioning, and steroid-requiring febrile syndrome (without an identified infectious cause). These complications may occur despite intervening therapy between PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and allogeneic HSCT.

Follow patients closely for evidence of transplant-related complications and intervene promptly. Consider the benefit versus risks of treatment with a PD-1/PD-L1–blocking antibody prior to or after an allogeneic HSCT.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

Based on its mechanism of action, ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Animal studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway can lead to increased risk of immune-mediated rejection of the developing fetus, resulting in fetal death. Advise women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ZYNYZ and for 4 months after the last dose.

Adverse Reactions

The safety of ZYNYZ was evaluated in 105 patients enrolled in the POD1UM-201 trial with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced MCC.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 22% of patients receiving ZYNYZ. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥ 2% of patients) were fatigue, arrhythmia, and pneumonitis.

Permanent discontinuation of ZYNYZ due to an adverse reaction occurred in 11% of patients. These included asthenia, atrial fibrillation, concomitant disease progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, demyelinating polyneuropathy, eosinophilic fasciitis, increased transaminases, infusion-related reaction, lung disorder, pancreatitis, polyarthritis, and radiculopathy (1 patient each).

Dosage interruptions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 25% of patients who received ZYNYZ. Adverse reactions or laboratory abnormalities that required dosage interruption in ≥ 2% of patients who received ZYNYZ were increased transaminases, increased lipase, increased amylase, pneumonitis, and pyrexia.

The most common (≥ 10%) adverse reactions that occurred in patients receiving ZYNYZ were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, pruritus, diarrhea, rash, pyrexia, and nausea.

Specific Populations

Based on its mechanism of action, ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on the use of ZYNYZ in pregnant women. Human IgG4 immunoglobulins are known to cross the placenta; therefore, retifanlimab-dlwr has the potential to be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus. Advise women of the potential risk to a fetus.

There is no information regarding the presence of retifanlimab-dlwr in human milk, or its effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed children, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment and for 4 months after the last dose of ZYNYZ.

ZYNYZ can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.

Verify pregnancy status in females of reproductive potential prior to initiating ZYNYZ.

Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ZYNYZ and for 4 months after the last dose.

The safety and effectiveness of ZYNYZ have not been established in pediatric patients.

Of the 65 patients with metastatic or recurrent locally advanced MCC treated with ZYNYZ, 79% were ≥ 65 years, and 37% were ≥ 75 years. Clinical studies of ZYNYZ did not include sufficient numbers of younger adult patients to determine if patients ≥ 65 years of age respond differently than younger adult patients.

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Incyte Corporation at 1-855-463-3463.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for ZYNYZ for additional Important Safety Information.